Lizard Skins

lizardMeet my daughter’s lizard. If you’ve  been reading this blog long enough you’ve met him before, because he spent some time as my houseguest back in October.

He’s a skink. A blue-tongued skink, actually. And yes, that means he has a blue tongue. He eats worms and vegetables, and he’s rather partial to strawberries.

And on a regular basis he sheds his skin.

I was thinking about shedding the other day– shedding in the sense of getting rid of psychic and emotional clutter.  Thinking about all the old beliefs and assumptions that I have shed over the years. Thinking about dreams and wishes that were once of utmost importance to me that hardly seem to matter any more. Thinking about how my anxiety for the future dominates my thoughts so much less now that I have learned to live in the present.

When the lizard is getting close to shedding time he gets cranky. The old skin starts to become uncomfortable. When he finally does shed, there is a noticeable increase in his general energy level. And, of course, he’s just a little bigger.

When I am working my way towards shedding my attachment to an old idea, I too get the sense of being uncomfortable in my old skin — the old viewpoint makes me cranky.

And when I finally shed that idea that once fit so well but now feels so constraining, it does seem that, on a spiritual plane. I am just a little bigger.

 

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About Muddy River Muse

Writer. Reader Educator. Manager. Mother. Dreamer. And dedicated riverbank walker.
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10 Responses to Lizard Skins

  1. Doobster418 says:

    Good analogy. I think we each, as we grow, shed our skins. Well, in my case, I think my skin just gets more wrinkly.

  2. Liz says:

    Lovely analogy. And I don’t know whether that is a pink light in the tank or the actual colour of your lizard but it’s beautiful! You’ve made me think about my autistic son, Dylan, again. For many years I have commented on the fact that just before he makes a breakthrough or masters a new skill he becomes cranky and seems to almost slip back. I’ve come to feel really optimistic about the difficult days because now I have this idea that they will presage an exciting development. So the story of your daughter’s lizard, and connecting it with yourself, has made me think that in a way Dylan is shedding his old skin at these times. Thank you! Lizx

    • I am glad this resonated with you. My years of study of how adults learn has taught me that real, transformational learning is typically uncomfortable– painful even.

      The lizard is actually brown. He lives under a red heat lamp, because he needs a warmer climate than is typically found in a Winnipeg apartment!

      • Liz says:

        Ah! Thought the pink was too amazing to be true. I absolutely agree with you about adult learning. I tell my students this all the time – that my role is to scramble their heads and make them hurt. Some of them don’t like the idea of paying for pain 🙂

  3. alienorajt says:

    A beautifully expressed extended metaphor, Anna; I love it: a must-read piece, I feel. xxx

  4. alienorajt says:

    Reblogged this on ALIEN AURA'S BLOG: IT'LL BLOW YOUR MIND! and commented:
    This is absolutely brilliant: elegantly written, interesting, wise and so true. Do read Anna’s words!

  5. Liz Kibby says:

    Wonderfully moving. I usually picture it as a caterpillar turning into a butterfly, but this concept of shedding old skin in perfect for the smaller and more gradual changing of ideals spiritually. It certainly is a great time of change here on this planet, going along with that energy is leading to a lot of skin changes for many in these times!

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